14 countries adopt 2016 Danube Declaration

The declaration addresses the border-crossing problems along the Danube corridor

14 countries adopt 2016 Danube Declaration

High-ranking representatives of 14 Danube countries and the European Commission adopted the 2016 Danube Declaration at the International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR) on 9 February 2016 in Vienna. The measures foreseen in the declaration shall protect the Danube River and its tributaries.

“The Danube river is a unique living and cultural area that must be preserved for future generations in a liveable condition. The Danube Declaration supports this way, and is an important milestone in implementing measures across borders. This is the only way how we can protect the river from its source to the Black Sea“, Andrä Rupprechter, Federal Minister said at the conference.

The declaration addresses the border-crossing problems along the Danube corridor, regarding environmental protection and the risk of floods, and is also in line with the EU Water Framework Directive. The management plans foresee measures that will be implemented over a six-year period until 2021.

The International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River(ICPDR) is the steering body of cooperation in the Danube region. In1994 the founding agreement was signed in Bucharest. The Secretary of the Danube Protection Agreement is located in Vienna. Austria is actively involved in the Danube cooperation under the auspices of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW), through a broad-based cooperation of experts and chairpersonships.

www.icpdr.org

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